Farmer’s Market Totes ~ A Pattern

Today I’m excited to share with you a new tutorial, the Farmer’s Market Tote. Andover Fabrics was kind enough to send over some of Marisa of Creative Thursday‘s upcoming line Locally Grown for these bags. I am absolutely in love with the little sheep and strawberries.

It does feel a bit strange making bags for fresh veggies when it looks like this outside.

But I think that is partially what motivated me – I’m ready for summer! And anyway, it doesn’t need to be warm to need a big bag to carry our fabric around in, right? Let’s get started!



Farmer’s Market Tote

Please note, all seams are 1/2″ unless otherwise noted

Fabric Requirements
Outer Panel – 1/2 yard
Outer Pockets – 1/2 yard
Pocket Lining – 1/2 yard
Inner Lining – 1/2 yard
Straps – 1/4 yard (not a fat quarter)
Interfacing, (I used Pellon SF101) – 1 yard

Step 1: Cut your fabric.

Pattern Piece Size Number to Cut
Outer Panel 17-1/2″ x 20″ 2
Outer Pockets 14-1/2″ x 20″ 2
Pocket Lining 14-1/2″ x 20″ 2
Inner Lining 17-1/2″ x 20″ 2
Straps 4″ x 26″ 2
Interfacing 17-1/2″ x 20″ 2
 

Step 2. Iron your interfacing to the wrong side of your outer panel fabrics according to the manufacturers directions.

Step 3. Now we are going to do a bit of trimming. Take your 17-1/2″ (tall) x 20″ (wide) Outer Panel rectangles and trim a diagonal line from the top left corner to the 1-1/2″ marking on your cutting mat, as shown.

Step 4. Repeat on the right side of the fabric, cutting from the top right corner to the 18-1/2″ marking on your cutting mat.

Step 5. Once your fabric angles are trimmed, cut 2″ squares out of the bottom left and right corners. This is for your gusset later. Because there is a slight angle from steps 3 and 4, you won’t be removing an exact square. Just be sure to line up your ruler as shown below.

After cutting out the squares, this is what your Outer Panels should look like.

Step 6. Repeat steps 3, 4 and 5 for your Inner Lining.

Step 7. Now it’s time to trim the Outer Pockets. Just like you did for your Outer Panel, we are going to cut the fabric at an angle on the left and right sides. Line up your ruler from the 17-1/2″ marking on your cutting mat, to the 1-1/2″ (when cutting left) and 18-1/2″ (when cutting right) measurement on the bottom of the cutting mat, as shown. This will get you the same angle you cut on previous pieces.

Alternatively, you could use your previously cut Outer Panel as a template and trim along the already cut lines.

Step 8. Just as you did in Step 5, trim 2″ squares from the bottom corners. Your Outer Pockets should look like this.

As you can see, the Outer Pocket fabric has the same angles now as the Outer Panel fabric.

Step 9. Repeat for your Pocket Lining.

Everything is now cut – yay! Pat yourself on the back.

Now let’s sew it together!

Step 10. Take one of your Outer Pockets and one of your Pocket Linings. Pin along the top, right sides together. Stitch along just the top, using a 1/2″ seam allowance.

Step 11. Flip right sides out, and press. Top stitch along the finished seam.

Step 12. Repeat for your second Outer Pocket and Pocking Lining.

Step 13. Place your finished Outer Pocket Panel on top of your Outer Panel, as shown. Pin together along sides and bottom. Machine baste along the sides and bottom of the panel, using a 1/4″ seam allowance. ** Do NOT sew the cut out squares! **

Step 14. Now we are going to split the pocket into two sections. Using your ruler and a marking tool, measure halfway across the panel. Mark a sewing line lengthwise down the panel, as shown.

Step 15. Starting at the bottom of the panel and working your way to the top of the pocket, stitch your marked line. Cross over a bit from the top of your pocket onto the Outer Panel and backstitch. This will reinforce your pocket at the top.

Step 16. Repeat for the second Outer Pocket Panel and Outer Panel.

Step 17. Place your finished Outer Panels right sides together and pin along the sides and bottom. Take care to match up the top of the pockets when pinning. This sort of attention to detail will make your tote bag look professionally made.

Step 18. Sew down the sides and bottom of the fabric, using a 1/2″ seam allowance. ** Do NOT sew the cut out squares! ** Press your seams open.

Step 19. Now it’s time to sew the gussets! If you have never done this before, this is probably the trickiest step. I took a lot of photos to help explain.

“Open” up your bag in the corner where you cut the squares, and place the fabric back together matching up the side and bottom sewn seam, as shown.

Step 20. Pin as shown.

Step 21. Sew using a 1/2″ seam allowance.

Step 22. Repeat on the other side to make the second gusset. This is what your bag should now look like.

Step 23. Attempt to press your seams and flip your bag right side out.

Step 24. Repeat steps 17 – 22 to assemble your Inner Lining. **Leave approximately 5″ open along the bottom however, for flipping the bag right side out later.**

Step 25. Place your Outer Tote Section right side out, into the Inner Tote Section wrong side out, as shown.

Step 26. Pin along the top of the bag, and sew together along the entire top, using a 1/2″ seam allowance.

Step 27. Flip your bag right side out through the opening in the bottom of the lining.

Step 28. Stitch the bottom of the lining closed.

Step 29. Press your bag and top stitch around the top.

Step 30. Almost there! It’s time to make the straps. Fold the short edges of your strap fabric in about 1/4″. You can optionally stitch these down, as shown. Now fold your strap fabric in half, lengthwise. Iron to make a crease and then open.

Step 31. Fold your strap fabric in lengthwise towards the center crease line, as shown. Press.

Step 32. Fold in half again. Press.

Step 33. Stitch around each side of the strap. Repeat for the second strap.

Step 34. Measure 3″ on each side of the pocket line you stitched earlier. Place your strap ends at this point, 1-1/2″ down from the top of the tote bag. Pin in place.

Step 35. Stitch in place, around all sides and then diagonally, as shown.

Step 36. Repeat until all 4 strap ends are attached.

You’re done! Fill up your tote with all sorts of fun stuff!

Cutting Equilateral Triangles ~ A Tutorial

Cutting 60 Degree Triangles ~ Tutorial by Faith of Fresh Lemons Quilts

Next month, Kati of From the Blue Chair and I are going to be teaching a class at the Sewing Summit called “Shapes and Angles”. Kati is going to show everyone how to sew Y-Seams using Hexagons and Diamonds. I’m going to focus on Partial Seams and Equilateral Triangles. Because our class time is limited to 1 hour 15 minutes, we are asking everyone to cut their fabric at home ahead of time and bring the pieces to class.

Kati has posted cutting directions on her blog (here and here). Additional class details can be found in the Sewing Summit Google Group thread titled Shapes and Angles Class.

Let’s dig deep and try to remember Trigonometry class. I know, it’s painful. You probably remember that an equilateral triangle has three 60° angles. In order to cut your fabric for these triangles, you will need a ruler with 60° angle markings – there are two lines that represent 60°. The ruler does not have to be a special ruler for cutting triangles. Just needs the angle markings.

60Degree Line Markings

Let’s get started!


Cutting Equilateral Triangles

Step 1: Cut a 4″ tall strip of fabric.

60DegreeTriangle-Step1

Step 2: Using your quilting ruler, line up the 60° line marking along the bottom of your fabric strip.

60DegreeTriangle-Step2

Step 3: Using your rotary cutter, cut your fabric on the ruler angle.

60DegreeTriangle-Step3

Step 4: Next we are going to cut the third side of the triangle. Remember how your ruler has a 60° marking line going to 2 directions? This time, use other 60° line marking that you did not use the first time. (You will alternate marking lines, every other time you cut.) Make sure the ruler is lined up properly to create the top point of the triangle. Cut your fabric along the ruler edge to create your first equilateral triangle.

60DegreeTriangle-Step4

Step 5: Continue down the strip of fabric, lining up the 60° line marking and cutting additional triangles.

60DegreeTriangle-Step5

Enjoy all your pretty triangles!

60DegreeTriangle-Step6

A Special Note for Those in my Sewing Summit Class:
Bring at least 20 of these triangles to the Sewing Summit class. Although you are welcome to just bring triangles cut from one 42″ strip of fabric, you may want to bring a variety of prints/colors for fun.

Please bring the below additional cut fabric pieces for the Partial Seams portion of the class.
(32) 1.75″ x 5.25″ rectangles in various colors/prints
(8) 4″ x 4″ squares in neutral color/print

We will be beginning work on these sample blocks in class:

Art Gallery Fabrics Fat Quarter Gang ~ The Fresh AG Tote

Fresh AG Tote ~ Pattern for the Art Gallery Fabrics Fat Quarter Gang

Today I’m so excited to be able to share my first project as part of the Art Gallery Fabrics Fat Quarter Gang, the Fresh AG Tote!

I designed this tote with summer in mind, perfect for taking to the park or the pool. It’s a simple pattern for beginner bag makers as well. You can find the pattern over on the Art Gallery Fabrics blog and also the PDF download on their pattern summary page (if you don’t see it there right away, it will be there soon – just go to the blog post).

Now for the giveaway! Want to win all the Art Gallery prints I used on my bag (minus the solids)?

My rules:
• Leave a comment on this post

Art Gallery’s rules:
• Subscribe to the Art Gallery Fabrics blog
• Follow Art Gallery Fabrics on Pinterest
• Like Art Gallery on Facebook (optional)

I will pick a winner Friday evening, July 27th.

And don’t forget to add photos of your finished project to the Fat Quarter Gang Flickr group. Happy sewing everyone!

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Closing comments to pick a winner!
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The lucky winner is #124: Martha said “Love your tote:) awesome!”

Congratulations Martha! I will be emailing you for your address. Thanks for commenting everyone!

Birds, Bees and Butterfly Strands ~ A Quilt Block Tutorial

Butterfly Strands Header

I received some beautiful fabric in the mail this week – The Birds and the Bees by designer Tula Pink. This fabric was sent to me generously by one of my sponsors, Westwood Acres (you can see all their The Birds and the Bees bundles here). Amanda asked if I wanted to play around with some of this new line and I didn’t really have to think very long before saying yes!

Birds and the Bees

From the first time I saw this fabric online, I thought it would be perfect for a string quilt. I decided for a bit of a less traditional string quilt however. Yesterday I started making blocks that had random amounts of strings on them and I thought I would share a little tutorial for how I made these blocks. They look like butterfly wings to me so….here is my Butterfly Strands Quilt Block tutorial!

Butterfly Strings 3


Butterfly Strands Quilt Block

Cutting Directions
Background – Cut squares from your background fabric. These can be any size, as long as you are consistent for all your blocks. We will be trimming the blocks down a bit to square them up, so cut a bit larger than you’d like your final block. I cut mine to 8.5″ x 8.5″ and squared to 8.25″ x 8.25″.

Strings/Strips – Cut random size strips from your fabric, measuring from 1.5″ to 2.25″.

Block Assembly

1. Take your background square and cut a 45 degree angle (diagonal) from the square, using either the 45 degree line on your cutting mat or your quilting ruler. Each block should have the diagonal cut in a slightly different location, cutting more off some blocks and less off other blocks.

This is what your block should now look like:

2. Layout your stripes for your block. Don’t trim these yet, just get an idea of what colors you want to use for your block.

3. Right sides together, sew your first strip to the 45 degree diagonal of your background fabric.

Press your seams.

4. Using your quilting ruler, trim the ends of your strip.

5. Repeat with your remaining strips.

6. Square your block. As I said in the cutting directions, I squared my blocks to 8.25″ x 8.25″.

You’re done! Layout your blocks as below by alternating the direction of the string sections.

Butterfly Strands