Modern Quilts, Home Decor, and Handcrafted Clothing

Oakshott Cottons

Oakshott Cottons

A couple weeks ago I received a fat eighth bundle of Oakshott Cottons to play with from Michael Oakshott. I’m going to guess that many of you have maybe seen some of these fabrics around in blogland but haven’t had a chance to work with them yet. That was the case for me at least.

Oakshott Cottons is a family run British business which ethically manufacturers their fabrics in India. They have a photo story on their website that was really fascinating for me. I highly encourage you to check it out!

Oakshott Cottons

I sort of assumed Oakshott cottons were similar to the Kaffe Fasset shot cottons or Moda Crossweaves. This is partially true – however these have proven so much easier to work with from a quilter’s point of view. While the others seemed to slide and stretch a lot, these just seem much sturdier when piecing. And that’s in a good way. This color bundle is Lipari – Fat 8ths Pack. This bundle has been shot with black to create beautiful jewel tones.

Oakshott Cottons + Nightshade

I decided to pair some of the fabrics with Tula Pink’s Nightshade fabric for Halloween. I’m actually not sure I will get this quilt done for Halloween (this year) – I’ve been so busy prepping for the Sewing Summit! But I have started cutting. I’m using my Prism quilt pattern, but I decreased the block size down to 6″.

Oakshott - Nightshade Prism

I’ve had a lot of people ask me on Flickr and Instagram where they can get these fabrics. Oakshott does deliver to the US via FedEx from their website. Of course international shipping can be pricey. It might be a good idea to pair up with a couple friends and place and order and have them all shipped together. Happy sewing everyone!

October 8, 2012   13 Comments

Birds, Bees and Butterfly Strands ~ A Quilt Block Tutorial

Butterfly Strands Header

I received some beautiful fabric in the mail this week – The Birds and the Bees by designer Tula Pink. This fabric was sent to me generously by one of my sponsors, Westwood Acres (you can see all their The Birds and the Bees bundles here). Amanda asked if I wanted to play around with some of this new line and I didn’t really have to think very long before saying yes!

Birds and the Bees

From the first time I saw this fabric online, I thought it would be perfect for a string quilt. I decided for a bit of a less traditional string quilt however. Yesterday I started making blocks that had random amounts of strings on them and I thought I would share a little tutorial for how I made these blocks. They look like butterfly wings to me so….here is my Butterfly Strands Quilt Block tutorial!

Butterfly Strings 3


Butterfly Strands Quilt Block

Cutting Directions
Background – Cut squares from your background fabric. These can be any size, as long as you are consistent for all your blocks. We will be trimming the blocks down a bit to square them up, so cut a bit larger than you’d like your final block. I cut mine to 8.5″ x 8.5″ and squared to 8.25″ x 8.25″.

Strings/Strips – Cut random size strips from your fabric, measuring from 1.5″ to 2.25″.

Block Assembly

1. Take your background square and cut a 45 degree angle (diagonal) from the square, using either the 45 degree line on your cutting mat or your quilting ruler. Each block should have the diagonal cut in a slightly different location, cutting more off some blocks and less off other blocks.

This is what your block should now look like:

2. Layout your stripes for your block. Don’t trim these yet, just get an idea of what colors you want to use for your block.

3. Right sides together, sew your first strip to the 45 degree diagonal of your background fabric.

Press your seams.

4. Using your quilting ruler, trim the ends of your strip.

5. Repeat with your remaining strips.

6. Square your block. As I said in the cutting directions, I squared my blocks to 8.25″ x 8.25″.

You’re done! Layout your blocks as below by alternating the direction of the string sections.

Butterfly Strands

July 19, 2012   27 Comments

Parisville

Parisville

Hooray, I’ve finished my Parisville quilt! This quilt was made using a fat quarter stack of Tula Pink’s Parisville fabric.

Parisville Detail

This fabric is a work of art, with hidden images in the prints. Just beautiful!

Parisville Bench

These blocks were not hard to make at all. I cut out 8.5″ squares from the fabric and then I cut those diagonally into large HSTs. Then I cut strips of Kona Snow, 1″ x 13″. I sewed those down the long side of the HST and then placed another HST on the other side of the Kona Snow stripe. Square up to 8.5″ and you get a square with a white strip diagonal down the center. If you are not totally accurate with your 1/4″ seams, that’s ok (just be consistently not accurate so it all lines up in the end. ;)). Simply cut your squares at 9″ instead and then square them up to 8.5″ when you are done.

Parisville Drape

For the back I used Kona Cerise and a Kona tan color that I’m not entirely sure of the name right now. I added a simple strip of Parisville fabrics to the back.

Parisville Back

The quilting is free motion stippling. The binding carries over the same color as the diagonals, I feel like that really ties the design together. The final quilt measures 56″ x 64″ and will probably be listed in my shop shortly. If I can let it go. :)

Parisville Back Detail

September 29, 2011   37 Comments

Catching Up

TATB Sept Bee Block

I feel like things are settling down here from summer and I’m going back to a bit of a routine. That is a nice feeling. Yesterday I made my Twice Around the Block September bee block for Jen. She asked for Drunk Love blocks (ala Denyse Schmidt) and sent a collection of Anna Maria Horner fabrics. So fun!

I am also pulling out some UFOs and getting to work. First up is my Parisville quilt. (Excuse the bad camera phone photo.)

Parisville Progress

I really can’t believe I’ve had this one sitting around for months. Yesterday I finished all the blocks for the top and hopefully today or tomorrow I will have a chance to start sewing them together.

September 21, 2011   14 Comments