Aye Aye Captain!

Aye Aye Captain Quilt

One of the fun things about living with a 3 or 4 year old is their always-going imagination. My son has been in a pirate phase for months. He walks around with a cup on his foot (his peg leg), his finger curled like a hook and he’s even given himself a couple pirate names. Depending on the day, you can call him either Captain Willypanels or Captain Root Beard. That’s why when I saw Sarah Jane Studios fabric line Out to Sea, I knew it would make a perfect quilt for him.

Aye Aye Captain Quilt

This quilt was really easy to make. I combined several of the Out to Sea prints with other coordinating fabrics from my stash. These include some of Moda’s Mono Pez, Lizzy House’s Pearl Bracelets, Sarah Jane’s Children at Play, and Aneela Hoey’s Little Apples. I think one of the keys to making a quilt that really pops is using different shades of each color. As you can see, there are several obviously different shades of blue. But also, the yellows and reds are different. The prints with the white background give your eye a place to rest.

Aye Aye Captain Quilt

I cut each rectangle 3″ x 10″ and the quilt has 6 columns and 24 rows, for a total of 144 rectangles. The finished size is 57″ x 60″.

Aye Aye Captain Quilt

I had a definite picture in my head when I started this quilt, and that vision included rounded corners. I found a circular picture frame in my house that was just the right size, and used that as a template to cut the corners. It’s such a nice detail that softens the look of all those rectangles. Just don’t forget to use bias binding when you make something with round edges, or your finished product won’t lay flat.

Aye Aye Captain Quilt

I also knew I wanted to quilt with wavy lines. It gives a nice texture and reminds me of the ocean which is perfect for this quilt. I’ve mentioned this technique before, but as a refresher, I use the Running Stitch on my machine (Bernina stitch #4) and max out the width and set the length to 4.0. I use my walking foot while quilting.

Aye Aye Captain Quilt

The backing is a dark navy minky, which made for messy quilting! I had to really work the carpet in my sewing room with the vacuum after I was done basting. The binding is a dot from Sarah Jane Studios Children at Play line.

Aye Aye Captain Quilt

My son loves the quilt. While I was working on it, he told me he wasn’t going to use it. I called his bluff though, and luckily I was right! It’s quite a nice feeling to know he’s spending time now cuddling under something I’ve made.

Farmer’s Market Totes ~ A Pattern

Today I’m excited to share with you a new tutorial, the Farmer’s Market Tote. Andover Fabrics was kind enough to send over some of Marisa of Creative Thursday‘s upcoming line Locally Grown for these bags. I am absolutely in love with the little sheep and strawberries.

It does feel a bit strange making bags for fresh veggies when it looks like this outside.

But I think that is partially what motivated me – I’m ready for summer! And anyway, it doesn’t need to be warm to need a big bag to carry our fabric around in, right? Let’s get started!



Farmer’s Market Tote

Please note, all seams are 1/2″ unless otherwise noted

Fabric Requirements
Outer Panel – 1/2 yard
Outer Pockets – 1/2 yard
Pocket Lining – 1/2 yard
Inner Lining – 1/2 yard
Straps – 1/4 yard (not a fat quarter)
Interfacing, (I used Pellon SF101) – 1 yard

Step 1: Cut your fabric.

Pattern Piece Size Number to Cut
Outer Panel 17-1/2″ x 20″ 2
Outer Pockets 14-1/2″ x 20″ 2
Pocket Lining 14-1/2″ x 20″ 2
Inner Lining 17-1/2″ x 20″ 2
Straps 4″ x 26″ 2
Interfacing 17-1/2″ x 20″ 2
 

Step 2. Iron your interfacing to the wrong side of your outer panel fabrics according to the manufacturers directions.

Step 3. Now we are going to do a bit of trimming. Take your 17-1/2″ (tall) x 20″ (wide) Outer Panel rectangles and trim a diagonal line from the top left corner to the 1-1/2″ marking on your cutting mat, as shown.

Step 4. Repeat on the right side of the fabric, cutting from the top right corner to the 18-1/2″ marking on your cutting mat.

Step 5. Once your fabric angles are trimmed, cut 2″ squares out of the bottom left and right corners. This is for your gusset later. Because there is a slight angle from steps 3 and 4, you won’t be removing an exact square. Just be sure to line up your ruler as shown below.

After cutting out the squares, this is what your Outer Panels should look like.

Step 6. Repeat steps 3, 4 and 5 for your Inner Lining.

Step 7. Now it’s time to trim the Outer Pockets. Just like you did for your Outer Panel, we are going to cut the fabric at an angle on the left and right sides. Line up your ruler from the 17-1/2″ marking on your cutting mat, to the 1-1/2″ (when cutting left) and 18-1/2″ (when cutting right) measurement on the bottom of the cutting mat, as shown. This will get you the same angle you cut on previous pieces.

Alternatively, you could use your previously cut Outer Panel as a template and trim along the already cut lines.

Step 8. Just as you did in Step 5, trim 2″ squares from the bottom corners. Your Outer Pockets should look like this.

As you can see, the Outer Pocket fabric has the same angles now as the Outer Panel fabric.

Step 9. Repeat for your Pocket Lining.

Everything is now cut – yay! Pat yourself on the back.

Now let’s sew it together!

Step 10. Take one of your Outer Pockets and one of your Pocket Linings. Pin along the top, right sides together. Stitch along just the top, using a 1/2″ seam allowance.

Step 11. Flip right sides out, and press. Top stitch along the finished seam.

Step 12. Repeat for your second Outer Pocket and Pocking Lining.

Step 13. Place your finished Outer Pocket Panel on top of your Outer Panel, as shown. Pin together along sides and bottom. Machine baste along the sides and bottom of the panel, using a 1/4″ seam allowance. ** Do NOT sew the cut out squares! **

Step 14. Now we are going to split the pocket into two sections. Using your ruler and a marking tool, measure halfway across the panel. Mark a sewing line lengthwise down the panel, as shown.

Step 15. Starting at the bottom of the panel and working your way to the top of the pocket, stitch your marked line. Cross over a bit from the top of your pocket onto the Outer Panel and backstitch. This will reinforce your pocket at the top.

Step 16. Repeat for the second Outer Pocket Panel and Outer Panel.

Step 17. Place your finished Outer Panels right sides together and pin along the sides and bottom. Take care to match up the top of the pockets when pinning. This sort of attention to detail will make your tote bag look professionally made.

Step 18. Sew down the sides and bottom of the fabric, using a 1/2″ seam allowance. ** Do NOT sew the cut out squares! ** Press your seams open.

Step 19. Now it’s time to sew the gussets! If you have never done this before, this is probably the trickiest step. I took a lot of photos to help explain.

“Open” up your bag in the corner where you cut the squares, and place the fabric back together matching up the side and bottom sewn seam, as shown.

Step 20. Pin as shown.

Step 21. Sew using a 1/2″ seam allowance.

Step 22. Repeat on the other side to make the second gusset. This is what your bag should now look like.

Step 23. Attempt to press your seams and flip your bag right side out.

Step 24. Repeat steps 17 – 22 to assemble your Inner Lining. **Leave approximately 5″ open along the bottom however, for flipping the bag right side out later.**

Step 25. Place your Outer Tote Section right side out, into the Inner Tote Section wrong side out, as shown.

Step 26. Pin along the top of the bag, and sew together along the entire top, using a 1/2″ seam allowance.

Step 27. Flip your bag right side out through the opening in the bottom of the lining.

Step 28. Stitch the bottom of the lining closed.

Step 29. Press your bag and top stitch around the top.

Step 30. Almost there! It’s time to make the straps. Fold the short edges of your strap fabric in about 1/4″. You can optionally stitch these down, as shown. Now fold your strap fabric in half, lengthwise. Iron to make a crease and then open.

Step 31. Fold your strap fabric in lengthwise towards the center crease line, as shown. Press.

Step 32. Fold in half again. Press.

Step 33. Stitch around each side of the strap. Repeat for the second strap.

Step 34. Measure 3″ on each side of the pocket line you stitched earlier. Place your strap ends at this point, 1-1/2″ down from the top of the tote bag. Pin in place.

Step 35. Stitch in place, around all sides and then diagonally, as shown.

Step 36. Repeat until all 4 strap ends are attached.

You’re done! Fill up your tote with all sorts of fun stuff!